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bubble_blunder
23 November 2008 @ 02:27 pm
Okay, it's that time of year again! I'm going to try to make this simple. If you received a card from me last year, you will be getting one again this year. Unless your address has changed since then, you don't have to do anything at all. If your address has changed, or if you didn't receive a card from me last year, please go here (comments are screened) and give me your address info, so that I can get a card to you. I usually just send out Season's Greetings or Happy Holidays cards, but if you would like a specific holiday (Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Solstice, Yule, etc.), just let me know when you give me your address and I will make sure you get it. And yes, I do send cards to other countries, no matter where you are.

One more note about the cards. I don't do this because I expect a card back from you. If you want to send one, that's great, but please don't feel obligated to send, and don't feel like you can't put your address on here if you aren't sending me one. I really like doing this. It's part of my Christmas tradition, and it makes me feel good to do it.

If you need my address, and you are on my flist, you should be able to see it on the post in the above link. If you aren't on my flist and you need it, just comment here and I'll give it to you.

*huggles you guys*

~Lisa
 
 
How I feel: cheerfulcheerful
 
 
bubble_blunder
17 November 2008 @ 12:47 am
Okay, it's that time of year again! I'm going to try to make this simple. If you received a card from me last year, you will be getting one again this year. Unless your address has changed since then, you don't have to do anything at all. If your address has changed, or if you didn't receive a card from me last year, please go here (comments are screened) and give me your address info, so that I can get a card to you. I usually just send out Season's Greetings or Happy Holidays cards, but if you would like a specific holiday (Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Solstice, Yule, etc.), just let me know when you give me your address and I I will make sure you get it. And yes, I do send cards to other countries, no matter where you are.

One more note about the cards. I don't do this because I expect a card back from you. If you want to send one, that's great, but please don't feel obligated to send, and don't feel like you can't put your address on here if you aren't sending me one. I really like doing this. It's part of my Christmas tradition, and it makes me feel good to do it.

If you need my address, and you are on my flist, you should be able to see it on the post in the above link. If you aren't on my flist and you need it, just comment here and I'll give it to you.

*huggles you guys*

~Lisa
 
 
Where I am: home
How I feel: cheerfulcheerful
 
 
 
bubble_blunder
04 November 2008 @ 04:39 pm


Hubby and I dropped our ballots off this afternoon after we picked Cody up from school. We took care of some PTA stuff, and Tink (my laptop) and I are curled up on the couch glued to the TV with a bunch of tabs and widgets open, and will probably remain here for the next several hours.

I am thrilled and in awe to see so many "I Voted" posts on LJ tonight. Even if you voted for the other guy, I'm just so inspired by the sheer number of people who have gotten out and participated in the process this year.

I'll be live blogging here, behind the cut, throughout the evening, so feel free to check in if you like. ETA - Now with MSNBC WidgetCollapse )
 
 
How I feel: hopefulhopeful
 
 
bubble_blunder
02 November 2008 @ 06:34 pm
So, I'm feeling a little raw about my entry for this week's LJ Idol. I know that it isn't the best piece I've ever written, but I honestly didn't think that it was the worst. At the moment, I've only received 12 votes!

So, if you actually did like the piece, please go vote for me in Tribe 4. You DON'T have to be a member of the community to vote, and it only takes a sec.

And if you thought that the entry was lousy and doesn't deserve a vote, PLEASE comment either here or on the entry itself and tell me why. Part of why I wanted to do this was to improve my writing, but it's hard to get better if no one gives you any criticism.

~Lisa
 
 
How I feel: worriedworried
 
 
 
bubble_blunder
31 October 2008 @ 07:31 am
I grew up in Southern West Virginia. Anyone who has ever spent any time there will understand when I say that the culture there is such that it's nearly impossible NOT to believe in ghosts. Ghost stories are handed down not as a fun way to scare yourselves on Halloween or around a campfire, but as integral parts of an oral history that's been passed on for generations. Perhaps this is why no amount of scoffing has ever been able to convince me that ghosts do not exist, or that the supernatural experiences I've had are things that can be explained away.

Another huge part of the history of the culture I was raised in revolves around the coal camps. My dad, both of my grandfathers, and all of my great-grandparents worked the mines, and lived in the camps. My dad in particular has some amazing stories of his childhood.

A few of miles back from the banks of the New River, there used to be a hospital called McKendree, or Miners Hospital Number Two, as it was known at the time. It was established somewhere around 1900, and located close enough to the railroad that most of the patients arrived via train. In about 1939, it ceased to be a mining hospital and became either a nursing home for the African American population (according to official sources) or an Insane Asylum for the African American population (according to the history passed down through unofficial channels). Regardless, this too was closed in the early 1940's.

In the late 90's, I, along with a small group of friends, decided that it was time for us to discover McKendree for ourselves. The group consisted of two of us, myself and Kevin, who had grown up in Beckley, and firmly believed and respected the ghostly history of the place, and 3 friends who had grown up elsewhere, and thought that the two of us were insane. So, after we all got off work at about 11pm, we set out. It took us a while to locate the ruins, as they were no longer accessible by car, and it's difficult to find much of anything when it's midnight in the woods. Kevin and I swore that we could find it by following the energy of the place, while the others simply despaired that we'd have them lost in the woods all night long.

Eventually we did locate the place, and Kevin and I even managed to convince the others that what they felt there was real, and not some crazy attempt to scare the living daylights out of them. And after a few hours of wandering around, we decided to leave the ghosts in peace, and head home, with the knowledge that we'd managed to verify a bit of the area's oral history, and knowing that we would all later be able to pass this particular story on to our own children later on. It wasn't the first or the last time that we'd seek out a particular spot looking for the ghosts we'd heard about growing up. West Virginia is full of just such spots and before going our separate ways, we visited many of them.

That was more than ten years ago. Two of our number are now dead themselves, and none of the remaining three of us are still in West Virginia at all. And around this time of year, I always start getting the urge to go searching again, much like we did that night. I wonder if Chris haunts the road where he was killed, or if the house Kevin died in has become that place where no one lives for very long. Being clear across the country from the places that they died, and not being nearly familiar enough with the ghostly history of my current city, I try to content myself with going to haunted house attractions and experiencing the perceptions of fear and mayhem that popular culture seems to have instilled in most of America regarding ghosts and spirits. My own experiences with ghosts have usually left me with a sense of sadness or peace, so the fear that I am expected to feel seems strange and unreal to me.

I've begun to accept that my days of ghost hunting are over now, replaced with the day to day of being a mom, and a wife, and a grown up. Now I simply content myself with the rare days when the ghosts find me.

Happy Halloween!
 
 
 
bubble_blunder

and, just for fun.....Collapse )
 
 
How I feel: hopefulhopeful
What I'm listening to: Ya Gotta Have Hope
 
 
 
bubble_blunder
24 October 2008 @ 04:09 pm
The polls are once again open over at therealljidol! This week is Open Topic, so there really is something for everyone!

My post for the week is a rerun of a post that I wrote back in May. With all of the talk about racism in the US Elections, I thought it would be timely to repost it now.

So, as always, if you liked it, PLEASE go vote for me! You'll find me in Tribe 1, and you do NOT have to be a member of the therealljidol to vote this week. If I don't get more votes than at least one other person in my tribe, I won't be sticking around for next week's contest! In other words, PLEASE DON'T LET THEM VOTE ME OFF THE ISLAND!

The poll is located here, and it only takes a second to cast a vote.

Thanks and good luck to everyone!

~Lisa
 
 
How I feel: worriedworried
 
 
bubble_blunder
***This is a repost of something that was originally written back in May of this year. For those of you not affiliated with fandom, it was inspired by a long string of incidents related to racism and anti-semitism within the fandom community here on LJ. Being that most of what it says is particularly appropriate to the current discussions within the political process here in the States, I decided to bring it back up as this week's therealljidol post. I'll post the link to this week's poll when it goes up.***

I grew up in a small town in southern West Virginia. Back then, we were right on the borderline of being a rural community and a suburban one. There were around 100 people in my graduating class, and if any of them were Jewish, I never knew it. There was a very small temple in town. I remember being little and asking my mom about the "building with the neat star" on it. She told me that it was the Temple and explained that it was a Jewish church. My knowledge of Judaism was limited to what I read in "Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret", "The Diary of Anne Frank", and studies of The Holocaust in social studies and history classes. In general, religion wasn't really discussed, unless it was to bash Atheism or Satanism (which was meant to encompass both Satanism and all Pagan religions). I was lucky enough to have had a decent education about what exactly the Holocaust was, and how wrong it was to discriminate against anyone, let along to commit genocide against a group of people for any reason, yet I didn't know that being Jewish was as much about race as it was about religion. I had never seen an example of anti-semitism in my life. The racism that I was most familiar with was that which was aimed toward African-Americans.

I've always considered myself relatively well informed. After leaving home, I came into contact with a lot of things that I never saw in the small town where I grew up. I learned more about all sorts of "-isms", and just how prevalent they were. But I still thought that anti-semitism was somehow rare and uncommon. I don't know how I missed it. All I can say is that I was privileged enough to not have to notice. Even my multicultural counseling classes didn't address Jews.

As it turns out, my education on anti-semitism has come almost entirely from LiveJournal. I had never heard the word "kike" until the Yuletide debacle. I never knew about all the different ways that my Jewish friends were discriminated against every single day until the conversation came up on LJ. But, once I was made aware, I did a few things. First, I acknowledged my ignorance and asked for someone to rec me some books that would help me educate myself. Two, I acknowledged my own privilege and the ways that it could cause me to get in my own way. And most importantly, I listened. When people like chopchica, and kita0610, and ladycat777, and jennem and xanphibian and a host of others talked about these issues, I listened. And when hateful, awful, discriminatory things happened, I listened to the people who were racists too and I vowed to never be one of them. I also swore to never stand by and do nothing when faced with one of them. And I started paying attention to other discussions of race and discrimination on LJ and I listened to those too.

Listen long enough, and you will start hearing a lot of people talk about intent. Especially when they are called out on a racist statement or behavior. "Well, I didn't mean it that way." "You just took it wrong. I didn't intend to be offensive." Or how about, "Well my friend who is [FILL IN THE BLANK] didn't find it offensive so you shouldn't be offended either." This always makes me think of someone who hits a person with their car. "Well, I didn't mean to drive on the sidewalk." "I didn't drive on the sidewalk with the intent of hitting you. You just happened to be there and didn't move out of the way fast enough." "Well my friend got hit by a car and was just fine, so you shouldn't be lying on the ground screaming in pain just because I broke your leg." Except that people will say things to a person they have offended with their racism that they would never say to a person they had run over with their car. Well, guess what? When you say these things to a person you have just offended with your racism (even if you didn't mean to be racist or realize that you were being offensive), you really do sound just as stupid as if you had said the same things to a person you struck with your car. None of us has the right to tell someone else how they should feel. All people have a right to their emotions. You don't have to like them, but if you intend to make posts on a public forum like LJ, you have to deal with them.

And in the course of all this, I have learned to hate hate hate hate the word "tone". If you listen to the racists, or the people who sympathize with them, you frequently hear about the tone of those "hostile Jew-types" or those POC. About how it's because of their tone that people won't listen to them or change racist behavior. Never mind that the tone argument generally only pops up when the person making it can find no defensible argument to make in response to the real issue at hand.

Well, FUCK THAT!

Racism makes me angry! It pisses me the hell off! It outrages me! It makes me want to scream and rant and pull my hair out! And I get to view it through the glass of my privilege. So if I feel this way, I can't even imagine how a person who it's aimed at must feel. But, the way I see it, we should all be angry, pissed off and outraged about racism. If we aren't, it isn't going to go away anytime soon. And I am sick to death of seeing the people who work so hard to point out and fight against this type of behavior on LJ get slammed repeatedly with the tone argument. It's stupid and silly and completely ridiculous.

So now, I am making two more vows. I vow to start taking part in the discussions instead of just listening and to never make any attempt whatsoever to "watch my tone" while doing it. And I also vow to come to the defense of anyone who is subjected to the intent or tone arguments, and to do so angrily and in a manner befitting my pissed off-ness. Because righteous anger is the best weapon we've got against racism and ignorance, and I will use it to the best of my ability.

~Lisa

***The polls are now open! If you liked this entry, I can be found in Tribe 1, and you do NOT have to be a member of therealljidol community to cast a vote.***
 
 
How I feel: pissed offpissed off
 
 
 
bubble_blunder
17 October 2008 @ 01:07 pm

Your result for Are You a Jackie or a Marilyn? Or Someone Else? Mad Men-era Female Icon Quiz...

You Are a Katharine!



You are a Katharine -- "I am happy and open to new things"



Katharines are energetic, lively, and optimistic. They want to contribute to the world.





How to Get Along with Me

  • * Give me companionship, affection, and freedom.

  • * Engage with me in stimulating conversation and laughter.

  • * Appreciate my grand visions and listen to my stories.

  • * Don't try to change my style. Accept me the way I am.

  • * Be responsible for youself. I dislike clingy or needy people.

  • * Don't tell me what to do.




What I Like About Being a Katharine

  • * being optimistic and not letting life's troubles get me down

  • * being spontaneous and free-spirited

  • * being outspoken and outrageous. It's part of the fun.

  • * being generous and trying to make the world a better place

  • * having the guts to take risks and to try exciting adventures

  • * having such varied interests and abilities




What's Hard About Being a Katharine

  • * not having enough time to do all the things I want

  • * not completing things I start

  • * not being able to profit from the benefits that come from specializing; not making a commitment to a career

  • * having a tendency to be ungrounded; getting lost in plans or fantasies

  • * feeling confined when I'm in a one-to-one relationship




Katharines as Children Often

  • * are action oriented and adventuresome

  • * drum up excitement

  • * prefer being with other children to being alone

  • * finesse their way around adults

  • * dream of the freedom they'll have when they grow up




Katharines as Parents

  • * are often enthusiastic and generous

  • * want their children to be exposed to many adventures in life

  • * may be too busy with their own activities to be attentive

Take Are You a Jackie or a Marilyn? Or Someone Else? Mad Men-era Female Icon Quiz at HelloQuizzy

 
 
How I feel: sicksick
 
 
bubble_blunder
10 October 2008 @ 12:50 am
Walking into a house full of total strangers with your best friend, and discovering that after years of searching you've finally found your home.

*************************

When you jump off of a cliff and into a lake, the time spent between the two surfaces.

*************************

Walking out of your condo, strapping on skis, and making first tracks down the mountain to get breakfast at the lodge while the sun is still rising in the sky.

*************************

Daisies. Hundreds of white daisies.

*************************

Sloppy, slobbery, Labrador kisses as a wake up call.

*************************

Busting the curve on a test you just knew you were going to fail.

*************************

The first cup of hot chocolate of the winter, sipped in front of a roaring fire while re-reading your favorite book of all time in a house that is completely silent.

*************************

Coming home at the end of the worst day ever and having your partner meet you at the door with a glass of your favorite wine and the sweetest words in the world. "The house is clean, the laundry is done, there's a bath running with candles already lit. After you're done there, dinner will be waiting on a tray in the bedroom. Once you eat, I'll rub your back until you fall asleep."

*************************


Poets and philosophers have spent centuries trying to find the meaning of life. But I think I've figured it out. Life is about moments. Small, seemingly insignificant amounts of time are what make life worth living. For myself, what this means is that the secret to life is learning to find as many of those moments as possible. Personally, I shoot for one a day. And even on the worst days, if I try, I can always find, or create, at least one perfect moment. When I'm old and looking back on my life, I doubt that I will remember the details of the crappy PTA meeting that ruined my day. But I might remember drinking the perfect cup of oolong at the end of it.

~Lisa
 
 
How I feel: happyblissful